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    Unity
    By a Child

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw you hang my first painting on the refrigerator, and I immediately wanted to paint another one.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw you feed a stray cat, and I learned that it is good to be kind to animals.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw you bake my favorite cake for me, and I learned that little things can be the special things in life.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw you bake a meal and take it to a friend that was sick, and I learned that we all have to help take care of each other.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw you give of your time and money to help people who had nothing, and I learned that those who have something should give to those who don't.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I felt you kiss me goodnight, and I felt loved and safe.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw you take care of our house and everyone in it, and I learned we have to take care of what we are given.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw how you handled your responsibilities, even when you didn't feel good, and I learned that I would have to be responsible when I grow up.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw tears come from your eyes, and I learned that sometimes things hurt, but it's all right to cry.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I saw that you cared, and I wanted to be everything I could be.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I learned most of life's lessons that I need to know to be a good and productive person when I grow up.

    When you thought I wasn't looking, I looked at you and wanted to say, "Thanks for all the things I saw when you thought I wasn't looking."

    Why Can't I Skip My Twenty Minutes of Reading Tonight?"

    Let's figure it out -- mathematically!

    Student A reads 20 minutes five nights of every week;
    Student B reads only 4 minutes a night...or not at all!

    Step 1: Multiply minutes a night x 5 times each week.
    Student A reads 20 min. x 5 times a week = 100 mins./week
    Student B reads 4 minutes x 5 times a week = 20 minutes

    Step 2: Multiply minutes a week x 4 weeks each month.
    Student A reads 400 minutes a month.
    Student B reads 80 minutes a month.

    Step 3: Multiply minutes a month x 9 months/school year
    Student A reads 3600 min. in a school year.
    Student B reads 720 min. in a school year.
    Student A practices reading the equivalent of ten whole school days a year.
    Student B gets the equivalent of only two school days of reading practice.

    By the end of 6th grade if Student A and Student B maintain these same reading habits, Student A will have read the equivalent of 60 whole school days.
    Student B will have read the equivalent of only 12 school days.
    One would expect the gap of information retained will have widened considerably and so, undoubtedly, will school performance.
    How do you think Student B will feel about him/herself as a student?


    Some questions to ponder: Which student would you expect to read better?
    Which student would you expect to know more?
    Which student would you expect to write better?
    Which student would you expect to have a better vocabulary?
    Which student would you expect to be more successful in school....and in life?

    The ABCs for Parents (Source: unknown)

    Ask your child about the school day.
    Begin your child's day with a nourishing breakfast.
    Congratulate you child for doing well.
    Discuss homework with your child.
    Encourage your child to read.
    Find a quiet place for your child to study.
    Give your child responsibility.
    Hug your child to build self worth.
    Include your child in making simple family decisions.
    Join a library with your child.
    Keep your child on a schedule that includes exercise and sleep.
    Limit TV viewing by selecting programs with your child.
    Make the time you spend with your child special.
    Notice and discuss changes in your child's behavior.
    Offer to help your child organize school papers.
    Provide your child with good role models.
    Question the activities your child shares with friends.
    Respect your child's right to have opinions different from yours.
    Share an interest or a hobby with your child.
    Take time to listen to your child.
    Urge your child to say "NO!" to unwanted touching.
    Visit places of interest with your child.
    Work with your child to set up rules of behavior.
    Xerox and save records or articles that benefit your child.
    Yield results by encouraging your child to do better.
    Zoom through these ABCs again and again!
     
    This information was found at http://www.pcboe.net/les/teacher/elder/ .