Equity Practices: Honoring Martin Luther King

  • MLK Day

    Shortly after the 1968 assassination of the great civil-rights activist, Martin Luther King, individuals in both the Senate and the House of Representatives began proposing legislation to honor him with a federal holiday.  However, it took almost 15 years before the 1st Martin Luther King Day would be celebrated in 1986.  As we approach the 26th anniversary of this commemoration, let us remember the words of Coretta Scott King (The Washington Post,1983):

    "The holiday must be substantive as well as symbolic. It must be more than a day of celebration . . . Let this holiday be a day of reflection, a day of teaching nonviolent philosophy and strategy, a day of getting involved in nonviolent action for social and economic progress."

    Today, it has become traditional to celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King through acts of service.  Even in the time of Covid-19, we encourage all families to find a safe way to give back to the community.

    Video: The King Legacy of Service

    MLK Day: 20 Kind Acts for Children